Enric ii de frança

Enric ii de frança

Elisabeth of valoisqueen of spain

King of France, belonging to the House of Valois (Saint-Germain-en-Laye, 1519 – Paris, 1559). He inherited the throne from his father, Francis I of France, in 1547, and continued his policy of struggle against the power of the Habsburgs; for this he did not hesitate to strengthen the French alliance with the Turks and to ally himself with the rebellious Protestant princes of the Empire, although in the interior of his kingdom he fought the French Protestants (the Huguenots).
Internally, the reign of Henry II of France was characterized by a reinforcement of the royal power, with the institution of the Council of Business, four Secretariats of State and new provincial courts. He took the fight against the Huguenots to the point of decreeing the death penalty for those who clandestinely practiced the Calvinist cult. His marriage to Catherine de Medici gave him ten children, three of whom would succeed to the French throne (Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III), after the crisis triggered by the death of the king from wounds received in a tournament.

Enric iv

In the 16th century, the 2nd and 3rd dukes of Guise Francis I and his son Henry I were protagonists of the Wars of Religion in France leading the Catholic party of the Catholic League and competing with the House of Bourbon for the legitimacy to the throne of France.
The cardinals began secret negotiations with the pope to defend Henry VIII’s position, and the second son of Francis I, Duke of Orleans and future Henry II, was betrothed to the pope’s niece, Catherine de Medici.
In 1589 his king Henry III of Navarre also took over the kingdom of France, after the assassination of King Henry III of France, and after abjuring and converting to Catholicism with the famous phrase “Paris is worth a mass”.
In 1589 their king Henry III of Navarre also assumed the kingdom of France, after the assassination of the king of France Henry III of France, and after abjuring and converting to Catholicism with the famous phrase “Paris is worth a mass”.
The austerity in which they lived attracted the favors of nobles and kings who became protectors of the order, such as Henry II of England and Louis IX of France, who founded the monastery of Vincennes, near Paris.

Louis xii

Henry II of France King of France (1547-1559) Born on March 31, 1519 in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, he was the second son of King Francis I. He married Catherine de Medici in 1533 and in 1547 he acceded to the throne when his father died. Second son of King Francis I. He married Catherine de Medici in 1533 and, in 1547, acceded to the throne when his father died. During his reign he was greatly influenced by his mistress, Diane de Poitiers, Duchess of Valentinois, and by the Constable de Montmorency.
Mexican priest and insurgent -I am a servant of the nation- Considered one of the main heroes of the Mexican Independence. Rank: Generalissimo Parents: Juana María Guadalupe Pérez Pavón and Jos…

Isabella of valois

The College of Cardinals was divided in three parties that supported a person: French Party: it reunited the supporters of the king Henry II of France, headed by Charles of Lorraine-Guise.
When Henry II of France resumed military activity in the Italian peninsula in 1551, Hercules II supported the French, taking command of the league formed by France, the Papal States and Ferrara against the imperial power.
Thus, in the late afternoon of 1588, taking advantage of the civil war that was raging in the kingdom of France during the reign of Henry II of France, he occupied the Marquisate of Saluzzo, which was still under French protection.
The cardinals began secret negotiations with the pope to defend Henry VIII’s position, and the second son of Francis I, Duke of Orleans and future Henry II, was betrothed to the pope’s niece, Catherine de Medici.
It was also negotiated the liberation of the royal infants, children of the king of France, Francesc and Enric (who later would be Enric II of France), who were as ostatges in Madrid in fulfillment of the Treaty of Madrid (1526) in exchange for the payment of two million escutcheons.